teejaystumbles:

"We’re gonna see AC/DC, babe!""Yeah, whatever Tony… *sigh*"

teejaystumbles:

"We’re gonna see AC/DC, babe!"
"Yeah, whatever Tony… *sigh*"

abrza:

[Trevor Slattery/Mandarin voice] Amurica.

abrza:

[Trevor Slattery/Mandarin voice] Amurica.

(via triwizahrd)

Rose has been watching my X-Files DVDs, and today we hit Soft Light.

Half the time when anyone says “Dr. Banton” I hear “Dr. Banner” and he was changed in a lab accident with an overdose of radiation and about halfway through I realize this is pretty much exactly what would happen if the Hulk were invisible.

He would sound exactly this crazy and paranoid when he said things like “Don’t do this certain thing, you won’t like the results” or “The government is after me, they want to take out what’s in my head” or “It wasn’t me, I have no control over this.”

He would be this much more desperate for it all to stop somehow.

And it just gives me such feels.

pancakiest:

occasionally when i’m watching im3 i’ll notice that tony is wearing that pink dora the explora watch casually in some scenes and i’ll just BURST INTO LAUGHTER

(via qwanderer)

theravenofwynter:

deleted-movie-lines:

Deleted WTNV textpost lines - Thor (2011) AU

In which we all know where Loki *really* went after he fell from the Bifrost. 

I don’t like this meme, but this one is nicely done!

xjapanda:

Since it’s the weekend I have time to draw :D

xjapanda:

Since it’s the weekend I have time to draw :D

hidingmai:

my fanbook《the water》 sold out!THX!

(via falconbigbutt)


A Kiev art museum contains a curious icon from St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mt. Sinai in Israel. It shows two robed Christian saints. Between them is a traditional Roman ‘pronubus’ (a best man), overseeing a wedding. The pronubus is Christ. The married couple are both men.
Is the icon suggesting that a gay “wedding” is being sanctified by Christ himself? The idea seems shocking. But the full answer comes from other early Christian sources about the two men featured in the icon, St. Sergius and St. Bacchus, 2 two Roman soldiers who were Christian martyrs. These two officers in the Roman army incurred the anger of Emperor Maximian when they were exposed as ‘secret Christians’ by refusing to enter a pagan temple. Both were sent to Syria circa 303 CE where Bacchus is thought to have died while being flogged. Sergius survived torture but was later beheaded. Legend says that Bacchus appeared to the dying Sergius as an angel, telling him to be brave because they would soon be reunited in heaven.
While the pairing of saints, particularly in the early Christian church, was not unusual, the association of these two men was regarded as particularly intimate. Severus, the Patriarch of Antioch (512 - 518 CE) explained that, "we should not separate in speech they [Sergius and Bacchus] who were joined in life". This is not a case of simple “adelphopoiia.” In the definitive 10th century account of their lives, St. Sergius is openly celebrated as the “sweet companion and lover” of St. Bacchus. Sergius and Bacchus’s close relationship has led many modern scholars to believe they were lovers. But the most compelling evidence for this view is that the oldest text of their martyrology, written in New Testament Greek describes them as “erastai,” or “lovers”. In other words, they were a male homosexual couple. Their orientation and relationship was not only acknowledged, but it was fully accepted and celebrated by the early Christian church, which was far more tolerant than it is today.
Contrary to myth, Christianity’s concept of marriage has not been set in stone since the days of Christ, but has constantly evolved as a concept and ritual.
(source)

A Kiev art museum contains a curious icon from St. Catherine’s Monastery on Mt. Sinai in Israel. It shows two robed Christian saints. Between them is a traditional Roman ‘pronubus’ (a best man), overseeing a wedding. The pronubus is Christ. The married couple are both men.

Is the icon suggesting that a gay “wedding” is being sanctified by Christ himself? The idea seems shocking. But the full answer comes from other early Christian sources about the two men featured in the icon, St. Sergius and St. Bacchus, 2 two Roman soldiers who were Christian martyrs. These two officers in the Roman army incurred the anger of Emperor Maximian when they were exposed as ‘secret Christians’ by refusing to enter a pagan temple. Both were sent to Syria circa 303 CE where Bacchus is thought to have died while being flogged. Sergius survived torture but was later beheaded. Legend says that Bacchus appeared to the dying Sergius as an angel, telling him to be brave because they would soon be reunited in heaven.

While the pairing of saints, particularly in the early Christian church, was not unusual, the association of these two men was regarded as particularly intimate. Severus, the Patriarch of Antioch (512 - 518 CE) explained that, "we should not separate in speech they [Sergius and Bacchus] who were joined in life". This is not a case of simple “adelphopoiia.” In the definitive 10th century account of their lives, St. Sergius is openly celebrated as the “sweet companion and lover” of St. Bacchus. Sergius and Bacchus’s close relationship has led many modern scholars to believe they were lovers. But the most compelling evidence for this view is that the oldest text of their martyrology, written in New Testament Greek describes them as “erastai,” or “lovers”. In other words, they were a male homosexual couple. Their orientation and relationship was not only acknowledged, but it was fully accepted and celebrated by the early Christian church, which was far more tolerant than it is today.

Contrary to myth, Christianity’s concept of marriage has not been set in stone since the days of Christ, but has constantly evolved as a concept and ritual.

(source)

(via ladysifshandmaiden)

The best thing about all the set photos from Avengers 2

madmoll:

is that they’re all 300% more entertaining if you imagine that someone just out of frame just said something super offensive.

Exhibit A:

image

Quicksilver caught off guard by your extreme rudeness.

And then:

image

Cap’s getting real tired of your shit, douchebag.

#3:

image

Wanda and Clint think that joke was just a little off-color there, bro.

And!

image

Seriously, dude? Seriously?

And my personal favorite:

image

Even Tony Stark is speechless. Banner’s not even mad, just kinda impressed.

(via velvet-muffin)

asker

Anonymous asked: How did Zola recover Bucky if he was in the Allies' custody at the time?

frankenwhales:

He didn’t.

In Bucky’s little flashback scene in Cap 2, it was a Russian soldier who found him. He spoke Russian on the bridge. He has the red star on his arm.

Zola said that HYDRA had been guiding world history. Given that both the USA and USSR were two of the greatest superpowers in the wake of WWII, it makes sense that HYDRA would have infiltrated the KGB much in the same way they did SHIELD.

When the USSR fell, he probably got transferred to Pierce. One of his first assignments while working for the ‘SHIELD Sleepers’?

image

Death of Howard. December of ‘91. The same month the Soviet Union collapsed.

My explanation is that Zola didn’t find Bucky, he merely recognized and identified him. Even if he was in the stateside HYDRA sleeper cell, I imagine both communicated, especially during the Cold War. I wouldn’t be surprised if HYDRA pulled the strings throughout the Cold War in the MCU.

Also, Bucky’s had many different arms in the comics. It makes sense that when Zola was smirking as he choked a guy out, it was an upgraded version and not his original arm.

IMO Bucky’s flashbacks were in bits and pieces, quick flashes. His mind was so frazzled at that point I don’t see why they’d hit him in chronological sequence.